brian flemming
Brian Flemming's Weblog

about me   |   email me


W H A T ' S   G O I N G   O N

the god who wasn't there
My most recent film, The God Who Wasn't There, is available on DVD at the official site and elsewhere.

the god who wasn't there
Bat Boy: The Musical is currently being staged in productions of various sizes around the world. A movie adaptation directed by John Landis is in development, with no casting announced or shooting date set.

danielle
My next feature film, Danielle, remains in development.

nothing so strange
Bill Gates is still dead.




B L O G R O L L

FILMMAKING:
Cinema Minima
Filmmaker
HD for Indies
indieWIRE Blogs
Hollywood Liberation Army
The Movie Marketing Blog

FREE CULTURE:
Creative Commons
Copyfight
EFF Deep Links
Freedom to Tinker
Lawrence Lessig

POLITICS:
Atrios
Daily Howler
Orcinus
The Raw Story
Talking Points Memo

OTHER FAVORITES:
Boing Boing
GreenCine Daily
Nora Murphy
Pharyngula




J O I N





Creative Commons License
Original text in this weblog is licensed under a
Creative Commons License





A R C H I V E S

March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003





powered by
movable type


posted with ecto





THIS ENTRY:
There have been a lot of great video responses to the Blasphemy Challenge. From Catalan to New Zealand, everyone is jumping at the opportunity and happily dissing that wispy bastard: Infidel guys, soldiers, closet cases, the entire CFI community of...


| HOME |


December 17, 2006

Reactions to the Blasphemy Challenge

There have been a lot of great video responses to the Blasphemy Challenge. From Catalan to New Zealand, everyone is jumping at the opportunity and happily dissing that wispy bastard: Infidel guys, soldiers, closet cases, the entire CFI community of Central Indiana, humanism itself and even Darth Vader (although I think he was already headed to H-E-double-hockey-sticks anyway). PZ text-blogged his blasphemy, because he already owns the DVD. This blogger also made some good highlight choices.

It's not all sweetness and light, however. The Blasphemy Challenge is controversial with some atheists. Over at the RichardDawkins.net discussion, few are without an opinion. One commenter says:

This seems misguided at best. We should be trying to prove to the world that atheists are good and decent people just like the rest of the world (ok, well, good and decent at least), and a stunt like this will just anger people and also alienate closet-agnostic atheists whom we should be trying to recruit. This is a bad idea.

But another commenter says, "There's room for all sorts of approaches in this fight, and ridicule is a very potent weapon." He then quotes Sam Harris on that subject:

I think we should not underestimate the power of embarrassment. The book Freakonomics briefly discusses the way the Ku Klux Klan lost its subscribers, and the example is instructive. A man named Stetson Kennedy, almost single-handedly it seems, eroded the prestige of the Ku Klux Klan in the 1940s by joining them and then leaking all of their secret passwords and goofy lingo to the people who were writing "The Adventures of Superman" radio show. Week after week, there were episodes of Superman fighting the Klan, and the real Klan's mumbo jumbo was put out all over the airwaves for people to laugh at. Kids were playing Superman vs. the Klan on their front lawns. The Klan was humiliated by this, and was made to look foolish; and we went from a world in which the Klan was a legitimate organization with tens of millions of members – many of whom were senators, and even one president – to a world in which there are now something like 5,000 Klansmen. It's basically a defunct organization.

You may be able to guess where I stand on the issue.





HOME